Britain’s most successful Olympian, Sir Chris Hoy, today announced a new partnership with British Cycling’s Go-Ride programme and Evans Cycles, that will help to deliver over two million opportunities for young people to get into cycling by 2020.

British Cycling’s Go-Ride programme – an initiative where young people experience coaching and competitive racing for the first time – will be supplied with 1,500 bikes from Evans Cycles to run thousands of Go-Ride sessions across the country.

Last year, over 30,000 young people got involved with the Go-Ride programme, which also aims to find the next generation of world champion cyclists – as the first step on the Great Britain Cycling Team Performance Pathway.

Commenting on the partnership, Evans Cycles ambassador Sir Chris Hoy said:

“Inspiring young people across the country to start cycling and realise how great it can be is something I really believe in. That’s why Evans Cycles and I jumped at the chance to provide HOY bikes for British Cycling’s Go-Ride programme over the next four years, and hopefully we can help find the world champions of tomorrow.”

Over 60% of the elite riders who will go for gold at Rio 2016 began their career in the Go-Ride programme. The ambition for the new partnership is to enable more children to experience the joy of cycling, unlock their cycling talent, and – who knows – even inspire them to go for gold at the Tokyo Olympics 2020 and beyond.

Go-Ride, which was started over a decade ago, is now British Cycling’s flagship programme for young people, supported by Sport England, Sky, the Bicycle Association and Lazer helmets.

British Cycling’s Director of Coaching, Education and Development, John Mills, said:

“We’re thrilled to be partnering with Evans Cycles as the provider of the bikes we use to deliver Go-Ride. The fact that the bikes bear the name of one of the most phenomenal athletes Britain has ever seen is sure to inspire thousands of young people to get into the sport. We are confident that we can provide over two million opportunities for young people nationwide to get into cycling by 2020 and this partnership will help us to be more ambitious than ever in uncovering the next generation of talent.”

There are over 300 Go-Ride clubs across the country in communities and schools, where young people are able to sample the various cycling disciplines and enjoy one of the fastest growing sports in the UK. The programme is supported by Go-Ride Racing, which is a calendar of entry-level, local racing events for young riders.

James Backhouse, Evans Cycles Marketing Director said:

“Riding your bike is one of the greatest things in the world, and by partnering with British Cycling we can help youngsters across the country discover that for themselves. We’re enormously proud to be part of the Go-Ride programme and are flattered that British Cycling gave us the opportunity.”

For more information about how to get into cycling visit www.britishcycling.org.uk/getinvolved

For more information on HOY children’s bikes visit www.evanscycles.com/pages/hoy-bikes

 

Sir Chris Hoy offers his top tips to parents to get children on their bikes:

1. Take your time choosing the bike
Heavy bikes can put children off cycling and will have them struggling up any little ramps or hills on the way. Lots of kid’s bikes on the high street weigh an absolute ton, but Evans Cycles pride themselves on selling quality children’s bikes (like the HOY ones, naturally) which can endure the same kind of thrashing as an adult’s bike.

2. Learn to stop before you start
It’s sensible to teach your kids the basics of braking before they start going fast. This will keep them safe during their first parent-free runs and give them confidence and the feeling of control.

3. Lose the pedals
For the very youngest budding cyclists, a great alternative to stabilisers is ‘runner’ bikes. Try one to help your toddler get to grips with the basics of balance and being in the cycling position for the first time.

4. Safety first
Not all kids want kids’ helmets – sometimes they want to be ‘big kids’ – but once children are old enough to understand, try talking to them about the reasons for wearing a helmet as well as leading by example yourself. And it goes without saying that choosing a great-looking lid that fits well makes all the difference.

5. Get going
Head for somewhere away from busy roads and lots of people where your little ones can have the space to develop their bike handling skills. Wheelies, track-stands and jumps are all things you can work up to…